Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Winter Wednesday - Italian Spring

Today is a combined Winter Wednesday and Sustainable Saturday post.

This Saturday I will be participating in the 15 Day Winter Author Blog Challenge.  If you have ever written a book, tried to write a book, have ever thought about writing a book, or just like to hang out in cyberspace with authors, I invite you to join our fun group.  The Challenge starts on Friday.  My next Sustainable Saturday post will be on Saturday, March 16.

Last Saturday, spouse and I went to the local Christmas Tree Shop, which is a place where you can find bargains, and - the unexpected.  It is the kind of store (and no, I am not being paid for this plug) where you walk in intending to buy one thing and come out wondering (in a good way) how you ever spent $40.

There was a display of seeds, and to our delight, they were Italian seeds.  Not seeds of Italian type veggies, but - Italian veggies from Italy.  Barely a word of English on the labels

Some of the veggies were familiar - carrots, cippolini onions,  fava beans. (not my favorite, but spouse likes them). Others were new to my gardening experience. I had never seen caper seed sold in a store. Spouse uses capers in his cooking, and I also enjoy them.

Dreaming of an unusual garden, spouse bought three packets: an unusual broccoli (Spigarello broccoli), an Italian lungo cucumber, and mixed leaf lettuces.

Our bill, by the way, including the seeds (each packet was under $2.00 - not bad, nowadays) and our other purchases, was $37.  I think the one item we intended to purchase was about $4.00.  Now, that's merchandising.

We've been gardening for some 40 years, but every spring is a new experience.  Wish us luck with our Italian seeds!

6 comments:

  1. I love seeds. I used to do a vegetable garden - but now it's just flowers - lovely post!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Caper seeds!!? Any chance that I could pay you to mail me a packet? Then we could test how they grow in E.Texas heat & humidity!! (Betcha I can find a recipe for pickling capers...)

    What fun! Hope that your Italian specialties do well for y'all this summer.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Love gardening - we try to be as organic as possible and grow a lot of our own food too here in Australia. I only wish I had as much success as my Mum used to - we always had many different types of fruit trees (orange, apricot, nectarine, peach, fig, white and red grapes, lemon etc) and all sorts of veggies growing up! I was lucky!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi,

    First, I love gardening - flowers, vegetables, etc. Second, I am an aspiring author. Would consider joining this challenge if I knew more about it.

    Nice post; short and sweet. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  5. How wonderful I wish you lots of luck with those Italian seeds. I can't garden at all but I do like the end result of gardening. Have fun.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I have never seen seeds packages in the US that appear to have been packaged for foreign sale. I wonder how they got them.... It makes me think of those forms you fill out when you re-enter the country assuring immigration that you are not carrying any seeds from abroad.... Anyway, I would certainly buy some too given the op.

    ReplyDelete

Hello! I welcome comments, as long as they are civil, are on topic, and do not contain profanity, advertising of any kind or spam. Any messages not meeting these criteria will immediately be composted, and my flowers will enjoy their contents.