Thursday, June 13, 2013

Spring Things - Wild Roses Couldn't Keep Me Away

OK, Kathy Purdy at Cold Climate Gardening (a most worthy blog, if you are interested in gardening in upstate New York, or a similar clime) this one's for you.
This is a picture I took of a wild rose on our local walking trail this past weekend.  Unfortunately, it is everywhere - this is an invasive species, and its beauty is deceptive.  They don't keep me off the trail, but it's a little sad to know the truth of the beauty you are walking past.

I had called it, in a previous post where I was talking from memory, a rugosa rose.  You told me chances were that it wasn't.  So I am curious to know, given that it is common on the trailsides of the Vestal Rail Trail, exactly what this is.  (If anyone else knows exactly what kind of rose this is, please let me know.)

Meantime, the wild rose we have on our small city lot (which is pinkish in color) is getting ready to bloom.  I hope it is ready by Saturday, Garden Bloggers Bloom Day. (I also hope we aren't in the middle of a flood on Saturday, but that's another story.)

Tomorrow - tame, old fashioned, wonderful scented roses.

Do you like wild roses?

18 comments:

  1. This wild rose reminds me of the blackberry bramble. However, the bloom is larger and the leaves are rose-like. I guess it invades the same way. I just looked up dogwood rose. Check out the pictures here. https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=dogwood+rose&client=firefox-a&hs=jg7&rls=org.mozilla:en-GB:official&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=nLS5UeTRI4Kt0QWh7oCgBA&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAQ&biw=1360&bih=601#facrc=_
    Looks similar.

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    1. These blooms do remind me of blackberries, but bigger. I have never heard of a dogwood rose - not sure we have it in the United States. It is a beautiful flower. There are so many kinds of wild roses. When the one on my property blooms I will try to get a good picture. The trick is trying to find a day when it isn't raining.

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  2. Be thankful the Eastern Seaboard weather of today is stopping at Philly- or those would just be wisps in the wind!

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    1. We lucked out, Roy. But we have more rain in the forecast, and the rain keeps on coming. I have to admit, I am starting to get just a wee bit anxious.

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  3. My flower knowledge is limited. Ok, almost non existant really. ;)
    The most beautiful roses I´ve seen were the ones in the Patagonia by the Andes mountains although I didn´t know the proper names for each variety.

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    1. That sounds wonderful. I've never been to South America. I'd love to, one day.

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  4. Gorgeous pic! Wish I had a way to garden. My apartment complex just isn't conducive for growing anything...

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    1. I can identify - I lived my first 21 years in city housing projects in the Bronx. My Mom managed to grow geraniums and some houseplants. But that was it.

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  5. I love the old-fashioned wild roses that grow along the roads in Nebraska. They are invasive, also, but they seem to grow very low and very slowly. And their scent is heavenly. Looking forward to tomorrow's post!

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    1. I think you will enjoy tomorrow's post. I wish there was such a thing as smell-o-blog. You'll see why tomorrow.

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  6. Multiflora rose would be my guess. It is very fragrant and very aggressive. It is more common than the native wild roses, sadly. Thanks for the shout out.

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    1. Thank you, Kathy. Appreciate your time - feel free to identify my mystery plants any time!

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  7. Kathy is a good one to ask - she knows more plants off the top of her head than anyone else I know. Going plant shopping with her is really fun!

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    1. I may have another rose for her to identify tomorrow - a pink wild rose that is on my city lot near Johnson City growing in a patch of lilacs. It should be blooming any day.

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  8. They're beautiful (even though they don't look anything like roses)I hasten to add that I have very little 'flower knowledge' !

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    1. Wild rose flowers don't look much like the cultivated varieties. It's amazing what we can do with plant breeding. Those roses I posted look a lot more like large blackberry blooms than roses, but they are roses.

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  9. Once I get my Bloom Day post up, I'll be showing a picture of a wild rose, too. Unfortunately, I have no idea exactly what it is! Also not sure when that post is going to hit the screen--very busy day around here!

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  10. This is a Rosa Multiflora. I've found it in Otsego Lake, Cooperstown, New York on our last visit, they have a very similar scent of roses, but they're very thorny.

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