Monday, April 18, 2016

Old #AtoZChallenge

Yes, I'm old.  According to some people, anyway.

I used to work for a man who is older than I am.  One of his favorite sayings was "age is only a number".  And, for myself and my husband, that number has a "six" in it.  And it isn't the second number.

As for that second number, we are reaching one of those milestones in growing old.

Remember when birthdays excited you?  Do you remember reaching 18?  21?  25?  

Then the fun really starts.  That first grey hair appears.  Your 40th birthday is an "over the hill" party with black napkins and plates.  Then, as you approach 50,  you start to get mailings from AARP. (For my readers not living in the United States, AARP used to stand for the "American Association of Retired Persons" but now is a membership organization for people of a "certain age" regardless of working status.)  Should you join, you get discounts on stuff, a great magazine, and other benefits for your yearly membership fee. 

And then, one day, you open your mailbox and out tumbles this.


This is the first page of a mailing from our health insurer.  It tumbled out of our box on Friday.

The brochure tells us we aren't the "old" kind of old.  We are the "new" kind of old. We are the old people who have blue motorcycle helmets and not blue-grey hair.  We have traded sensible "old person" shoes for jogging shoes.  We use computers.  We don't own rocking chairs.  We are strong, we are smart, and we are brimming with vitality, according to our health insurer.  We are also getting close to the age (remember that age is only a number?) where the government considers us to be....old.

 At 65, in these United States, you (well, most of us) become eligible for a government health care program called "Medicare". And health insurers can sell you supplemental insurance (to supplement the government program) or something called "Medicare Advantage", which is an alternative to Medicare.  (This, of course, is an oversimplified explanation).

For the first time, we are being solicited for supplenting what, in the United States, is the health insurance that people age 65 and over are eligible for.   It won't be the last time.  We know that too well.

Actually the mailing was survey - a short survey - for us to complete since we aren't at the eligible age - not quite yet, anyway.  "A salesperson may call", said a disclosure.

Yes, I bet one will.  And that's why I am not going to complete the survey.

Not yet, anyway.

Because, like it or not, we are close to being Old.  And, like that day we became eligible to join AARP, there are people rubbing their hands in glee, because there will be money to be made off of us.

Blue motorcycle helmets and all.

We who are Old look to the future, and wonder what crossing that Old threshold will mean for us.


"O" day for the Blogging from A to Z Challenge.

23 comments:

  1. 18 till I die!! that's my motto :P After sometime instead of celebration, birthdays just become another reminder of how old we are. But well, that's a part of life. ROFL at that blue hair comment :P

    A Whimsical Medley
    Twinkle Eyed Traveller

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    1. I love how an insurance company (I won't say who) wanted to make me feel young so I would purchase an insurance product that few people under 65 can legally purchase. It's too funny!

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  2. I hit 70 this year, but since I was 24 for 16 years, it doesn't seem like I am that old, lol. Then again, because my husband was older, I have been a member of AARP for almost 30 years.

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    1. I never did freeze my age. Perhaps I should have because for a long time people claimed I looked younger than I was. But when I stopped coloring my hair (I was prematurely grey in my 30's and just got tired of coloring it) so did the comments that I looked younger than I am. Oh well. I wonder how many 30 year members AARP has.

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  3. Aging is what we will all go through. In a way I feel great that the government is willing to do so much but I also feel if the reminder is a nag?
    Thanks for the information. I never knew these details.

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    1. I really don't like the reminder when it is just a sales pitch in disguise. In the United States, that's how things work.

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  4. I think the line that defines "old" keeps moving - I don't think too many 65yr olds are feeling "old" - they're just getting started. Mind you I'd be happy to have any discounts being offered! Leanne @ cresting the hill

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    1. I use very few of the discounts, truthfully - except for the hotel/motel discounts. I feel funny using them right now as I am still working full time. But that will change when I retire.

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  5. Let me tell you that Medicare is not the old Medicare. Now, you need to know your alphabet- up to N, if I am not mistaken..
    And, that Advantage- it's not an alternative. It's to make up for the cuts done to Medicare when a certain party was in power.

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    1. No, for this challenge, O is correct. I don't know much about "old" Medicare. Like many people, I ignored things about aging until - well, until I had to. Now that we are caregivers for my elderly mother in law, my husband and I are starting to learn the ins and outs of Medicare, but we have a long way to go. My developmentally disabled brother in law is also dual eligible (Medicare/Medicaid)and that is quite the learning experience. I was warned by several advocates not to enroll him in Medicare Advantage. Those ads are so appealing, though....

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  6. Oh dear I am getting there too! The only joy is knowing that all those who label us old will one day get there too!

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  7. I didn't have a 40th birthday party. I don't have birthday parties.

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    1. For many years, I didn't, either. Since my 50th birthday, I have had parties every 10 years, and it is a good time with family.

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    1. Yes, old is gold - or so they say. Mine is more silver because I no longer color my hair!

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  9. Growing old/older sure beats the alternative. The advantage to turning 65 is being eligible for Medicare and Senior Citizen status. I don't mind getting out my ID to prove it and I have always wanted to be a platinum blonde...LOL!!!
    Sue at CollectInTexas Gal

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  10. I recall using term like I'm 14 and half years old. Talking about age my husband family seem to be saying " we're getting old"
    it doesn't matter the age they are...Coffee is on

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  11. So much for getting old in United States. My mother in law is 68 and she is far more active and fitter than me even though she is diabetic. And she takes it with a pinch of salt if somebody calls her old. Yet she and my father in law are thankful for becoming 'Senior Citizen' (as they call in India) for the high interests senior citizens get on Bank Deposits and the discounts they get on railway tickets.

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  12. I figure getting old beats all hell out of the only viable alternative. ;) Congratulations. And I'm right behind you. Mine only has a 5 in it and I'm not QUITE eligible for the Denny's Senior Specials. But look out, world - I'm going to claim all my discounts, one day, and then some! And when I get to 100, I'm going to make up some weird thing for when the media asks, "What's your secret t longevity?" Like, "eating a teaspoon of fire ants every morning." Then we'll see who really wants to live forever. ::evil laugh::

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  13. You've made me feel that much better about feeling obsolete at 49.

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