Thursday, July 13, 2017

Pseudo Pseudo Pseudo Camilla - Thursday Tree Love

For today's #ThursdayTreeLove and Ultimate Blog Challenge #blogboost, may I present to you the Stewartia pesudocamellia, or Stewartia.  It is a relative of the camillia that I love so much, but won't grow in my upstate New York area (except there is a young camillia growing in my Binghamton area yard- a story for another day.)

This is not a common tree  here.  It's a slow grower, and loves moisture.  And, the flowers don't last long.

Cutler Botanic Gardens in Binghamton, New York has the above specimen.

So, what are the lessons of the Stewartia? 

According to Monvovia Nursery:

This unique genus of shrubs is classified into the tea family, Theaceae, which shows they are linked to the camellia, also evidenced by the species name. Linnaeus named the genus after John Sturat, the Earl of Buete and patron of the botanical sciences. Stewartia contains six species of shrubs and small trees all native to Asia and North America.. It is native to Japan.
The lesson that the Stewartia has taught me?  All trees are special, and if you don't look up, you don't know what you might be missing.

Now, I invite you to join Parul and other bloggers for #ThursdayTreeLove.  Simply post a picture of a tree, and link back to Parul's blog, and visit the other blogs participating. 

While you are at it, also check out the Ultimate Blog Challenge.

Day 13 of the Ultimate Blog Challenge.

14 comments:

  1. How beautiful! We live in the south and there are many Camellias but I've never heard of this one. Unless it's hear and I just never know what I was looking at, definitely going to look deeper into the beauty. Thanks for sharing your Tree Love

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  2. I don't think I have ever seen one around here. Thanks for the info.

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  3. This is not a species that draws my attention. But, that's what makes us have different backyards!

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  4. Nice and Informative!I know more about flowers but I love trees as well, they are fascinating how they grow!
    Thanks for sharing!
    Gaétane

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  5. Having grown up in treeless Southern Alberta, we have been known to worship them. This is beautiful!

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  6. Lovely post...That's very informative..Never known the name of this tree...

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  7. So pretty and a great reminder to look around whenever we're outside. I tend to do that when I'm traveling but not as much in the city where I live.

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  8. True that trees are special and we need to look up to to find out what's that special thing :) thank you for linking, Alana. :)

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  9. Yes the Thursday Tree love and UBC are my to dos too 😊.We have the pseudocamilla in India too .We used to make pretty rings by folding the petals when we were little 😊

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  10. The ultimate blog challenge looks interesting. I'll have to read up on it luv.

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  11. I should pay more attention to the trees around me. To be honest, I don't really.

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  12. That's a very important lesson for life, isn't it? Alas, many of us glide through life never ever looking up to see what all beautiful things are passing us by! Btw, beautiful shots again. Did I tell you, your IG feed with those lovely flower shots are as amazing!

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  13. I have never heard of these trees, thanks for sharing - its always nice to learn and reflect how we don't pay attention to beautiful trees around us.

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  14. Really pretty! This species is new to me, so enjoyed reading up about it. Thanks for adding the botanical name and family... The image reminds me of the Oncoba spinosa which grows in my neighbourhood..

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