Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Monarchs of the October New York Sky

If you want to see monarch butterflies, head to upstate New York right now (you can look at our fall foliage as a bonus).

The migrating generation of monarchs, having hatched out in Canada, have paused here to take advantage of our unseasonably mild weather.

These butterflies are heading to Mexico, where they will live out a life span of around nine months.  Fortunate migrating generation.

Just think of these fragile seeming creatures, making that migration.

The other day, we were in our community garden, where we have a small patch of zinnias.

And, there, we found....

Monarchs.  Several of them.

Feeding on nectar.
They seemed to like the yellow and white zinnias.

We also have green (Envy) zinnias.  For some reason, they were neglected.

We were in the right place at the right time, as we watched the monarchs of the October New York skies use our garden as a lunch stop.

Gratitude.  And, to those who commented yesterday, thank you.  I'm working my way through my back issues.  It's slow, but your thoughts cheered and helped me.

Day 10 of the Ultimate Blog Challenge #blogboost

16 comments:

  1. Lovely creatures. Thanks for the post.

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  2. A wonderful autumnal site- if you live in the right region. They don't bother visiting us folks here in the Commonwealth.

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  3. Absolutely beautiful! We saw some heading south at the club on Saturday, always lovely to see. What I always find fascinating is how a butterfly's flight always looks so flittery, silly almost, if you compare it to the directness of a bird's flight - and yet if you happen to be paddling in the same direction as a migrating monarch is traveling, it will flitter flitter by you like you aren't even moving!

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  4. Not just upstate! My husband and I were walking in Central Park this weekend, and we came to this wildflower area. There were more monarchs than I have ever seen in one place before. Very beautiful, but kind of frightening too. The unseasonable weather, well, I feel ambivalent.

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  5. These were thought to be Monarchs. But they were Painted Ladies.https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2014/09/24/mystery-solved-suspicious-radar-echoes-were-probably-migrating-monarch-butterflies/?utm_term=.0e4581983114

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  6. we have monarchs in our area too.. at the Natural Bridges State Park in Santa Cruz about a little more than an hours drive away from home.. but it has been a few years since we have been there during monarch season.. it is beautiful there at that time - trees literally covered with butterflies

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  7. You get the most natural shots, Alana. Lovely butterflies and their surroundings. The weather becomes hard for them.

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  8. A beautiful sight! I leave all milkweed intact, but I've never seen a monarch -- only an occasional caterpillar. And lots of milkweed bugs. Lucky you! Glad you got these great photos.

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  9. Beautiful. Zinnias are a great attractant for all kinds of butterflies.

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  10. As always your photos are awesome and I love your relationship with nature. Mine today was more pedestrian--I spent an hour cleaning up leaves in my garden. But now it looks lovely, Beth

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  11. It's amazing that such a tiny creature can travel so far.

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  12. Love butterflies and they're such a great analogy of life. Sometimes we are like a caterpillar crawling around and then we hide in our cocoon and then something in life spurs us to change and become a beautiful butterfly. Thanks for the blog.

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  13. I complain walking 4 blocks to the supermarket! And those little fellows make it all the way to mexico?!?! Wow!

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  14. Beautiful photos Alana! The Monarchs are so perfect it looks like they were placed on the flowers!

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