Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Phillip Phillips #AtoZChallenge #blogboost


Long before Orlando, Florida became a theme park destination, the Orlando area grew a lot of oranges.   To the south, past the theme parks, they still do.  
Here, to get you thirsty for some "OJ", is an orange juice commercial from the 1950's, featuring New York Giants football player (and late husband of NBC's Kathie Lee Gifford) Frank Gifford.

We can thank a number of individuals for introducing and developing the citrus industry in Florida, including a man by the name of Phillip Phillips. (No, not the same Phillip Phillips who won American Idol).

Dr. Phillip Phillips, who died in 1959, was a medical doctor, a philanthropist, and a businessman, and, most of all, a man who became rich off of citrus. Phillips first came to Florida in 1894.  His first venture failed when a freeze wiped out his crops.  But, he didn't give up.

He owned thousands of acres of orange groves.  He developed several innovative ways of processing and packing orange juice, including developing the "flash pasteurization" process that took the metallic taste out of canned orange juice.

I remember a brand of canned orange juice called "Donald Duck"....oops, I just made a Disney reference again.

Orange Juice processing plant
If you are ever in the Lake Wales (south of Orlando) area, I recommend a visit to the Grove House of Florida's Natural juice.  You get to taste the fresh juice, and it is oh-so-good.  And it's free, too.
When I lived on the West Coast of Florida between 1974 and 1976, we would sometimes (if the wind was blowing right) smell the wonderful fragrance of orange trees in bloom.  I wonder how many of those groves were once owned by Dr. Philips.

Today, Dr. Phillips has a number of buildings in Orlando (an art center, a high school, and more)  named after him.  It turns out I was staying in a suburb of Orlando, population of around 11,000 . Dr. Phillips had purchased this land in 1905 and turned into orange groves. My pictures were really being taken in Dr. Phillips.
I'll end this post with a picture of Poinsettias growing outside a store in Dr. Phillips.

Considering that we got snow squalls yesterday where I live in upstate New York (and many people got much worse), you'll forgive me for Pining away for Florida.

16 comments:

  1. I had never heard of Dr. Phillips until I read your post this morning. Very interesting about his impact on orange juice. You mentioned the scent of orange trees when they are in blossom if the wind is right. We have apple trees in the backyard and it's the same thing in the spring. The wind carries such a delicate and sweet scent on the air from the apple blossoms. Would enjoy smelling orange blossoms...I'm sure it's equally as beautiful!

    Ann
    https://harvestmoonbyhand.blogspot.com/2018/04/hobbies-that-begin-with-p-blogging-from.html

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    1. I live in apple country in upstate New York, yet I have never noticed apple scent on the wind. Too bad; now I know what I am missing.

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  2. I love learning about the "guy (or gal) who".
    Thanks for the share.

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    1. I am certain you would enjoy reading more about Dr. Phillips and the technical details of his inventions. (That info would go way above my head) Who knows, if you had been born when he was...

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  3. Alana,

    These late winter blasts infringing upon the arrival of spring has got to stop! I certainly can see why you're pining for Florida's climate. I would be if I lived up north, too. I bet the fragrance of orange blossoms are heavenly! By the way, you may want to check out today's post, A2Z iPad Art Sketches which includes your favorite bird. :) Have a good day, my friend!
    ~Curious as a Cathy

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    1. Your parakeet drawing was beautiful - I am touched so much, thank you! I waited until coming home to try to comment and I am going to your blog shortly.

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  4. I have never been an orange fan, but the best ones I ever ate were while visiting Florida. Yum!

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    1. I loved oranges as a child. As an elder, I like oranges more than they like me, alas.

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  5. Wow, the man who made orange juice delicious. Thank you for telling me about Mr. Philip Phillips.

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    1. The things an iPhone photo can teach you.

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  6. I had no idea he was such a force in orange juice. I wonder if orange juice would be such a thing without him.

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    1. I wonder, too. But maybe someone else would have come along and did what he did. I wonder, when he was growing up, if he ever said "gee,when I grow up I'm going to revolutionize the orange juice industry!" Probably not.

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  7. Interesting information. I remember the first time I drank orange juice made from the frozen cans - yes, it was Donald Duck!
    I am sorry to be so long answering your question about the Royal Palm Turkeys. From looking at photos on the Internet, I think the Royal Palm Turkeys have more white feathers than the ones I photographed. But thanks to your comment/question, I learned about something new - different breeds of turkeys
    Hope you are having a great week!

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    1. Thank you for stopping by, Lea. I am fascinated by domestic birds although my one experiment in growing turkeys - well, I'll stick to chickens if I ever live in a place where I can own them again.

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  8. So glad you wrote this post, I love Florida citrus but never knew this story.

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  9. Well, there ya go! A voice from the past for sure! Wow, I hadn't thought of making orange juice from those frozen cans in like forever. They don't sell those anymore do they? hmmm Oh boy, got a taste for orange juice now. I like pulp in mine, but hubby doesn't bummer! Sometimes I get the one I like just for me. YUM

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