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Thursday, February 11, 2021

Marcescence #ThursdayTreeLove

In winter, where I live in the Northeast United States, many trees take a winter nap.  Before they go into their hibernation, the tree cuts off nutrition to its leaves.  They die and fall off.  Usually.


But not always.  

Sunday, we took a walk on the local Vestal Rail Trail.  Along the walking path, contrasted against the white snow at the bottom, the blue sky (rare where we live at this time of year), and the hill behind it, a tree stood.  Its leaves are brown and long dead but the leaves hang on.  In fact, they will hang on until spring.

There's a reason for this:  Marcescence.  This is an explanation of why this happens.

Oaks (which I think this tree is) are one of several trees that will do this.

Joining Parul at Happiness and Food for her #ThursdayTreeLove. Why not check out trees and bloggers from all over the world?

13 comments:

  1. Thanks for this. It looks like you are having quite a winter back east! Hope you love snow! Laura

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  2. ...we went to Letchworth State Park yesterday, they have some fabulous oaks.

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  3. I grew up in a house with a pin oak. Every year gardeners would come through the neighborhood looking for work. They always asked my parent if they wanted the "dead" tree taken down.

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  4. I like this tree, even though the leaves look dry, the whole setting is beautiful:)

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  5. I've learned something new! When I saw trees like that, I just figured the wind hand't gotten to them yet. Never put it together it was actually...something! Marcescence. I must tell Husby.

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  6. That sky is a gorgeous blue. Interesting tree.

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  7. Great! I had not yet seen this phenomenon. I wonder why it happens though..

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  8. Oh wow! Those dry leaves stay on that long?

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  9. Thanks for sharing this and the reason behind this. The sky looks beautiful and the tree offers a great contrast. Thanks for joining, Alana! See you tomorrow.

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  10. Thanks for the bit of tree knowledge! --Chandra (iamchandralynn.com)

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